Twin Peaks Usenet Archive


Subject: Re: More Circumstantial Evidence that Leland did it (10/6)
From: chrisl@dip.eecs.umich.edu (Chris Lang)
Date: 1990-10-06, 22:57
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks

In article <1990Oct7.053052.15285@athena.mit.edu> jen@athena.mit.edu (Jennifer Hawthorne) writes:
> >Spoilers for 10/6, stop if you haven't see it yet:
> >
> >This goes back to the Leland-as-sexual-abuser-of-Laura theory.  It is
> >known that people who are abused as children very often become child
> >abusers in turn.  So, my theory is that the "real" BOB was the person
> >that Leland knew when he was a boy, and that "BOB" molested Leland
> >when Leland was young, possibly repeatedly.  As a result, Leland
> >developed a split personality, and the "bad" half of Leland has taken
> >on the personality of BOB, the person responsible for the trauma.
> > Leland as BOB acts out his childhood trauma at the hands of the "real
> >BOB" on his own daughter and eventually kills her.

This certainly seems to be what comes to mind after the last episode.  The
only trouble is that even if Leland has a split personality, it doesn't
explain why everyone who sees BOB sees the same physical being... this
would seem to suggest that BOB is still around, and not only as a second
personality of Leland's.  But I agree that things definitely point to
Leland even more strongly than before.  One can't rule anything out,
though, particularly now that the supernatural/alien connection has been
established.

On that subject, I don't have any problems with the introduction of
the sci-fi/mystical element, although I think that the Major's 'message'
seemed to possess just a little bit of desperation, as if Lynch/Frost
realized that they were taking far too long to develop this theme for the
average (non-fanatic) viewer.  It seems very un-Lynchlike to have the
Major come right out and plop down this rather major (no pun intended)
plot twist in Cooper's (and our) lap.  On the other hand, the Major isn't
the type of character to do things in a roundabout fashion.  What does
surprise me is that he said nothing to Cooper until the Log Lady tells
him to.  First of all, why would he keep the information from Cooper for
almost two whole days?  I would think that alien communications with a
specific recipient would warrant faster action than that.  And if the
Major *did* have a good reason to not act on the information, why would
the Log Lady change his mind?  I suppose receiving messages from aliens
would tend to make one more receptive of such advice, though.  :-)

Finally, does anyone else think that the Ben/Jerry/Jose/mill plot is
anywhere near developed enough to sustain the show after the murderer is
identified?  It seems to drag on without gaining any strength as a viable
story line.  And now it looks like the mystery of Cooper's former partner
is going to be introduced as yet another subplot.  (I think it's a bit
too late in the Laura Palmer case for Lynch to be introducing an entire
new character with a significant role, and I don't see how Cooper's old
partner would have much to do with the Hornes' business dealings, which
means there'll be another story line.)

 -Chris
--
Chris Lang   |   Univ. of Michigan Engineering   |   chrisl@eecs.umich.edu
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WORK: National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, 
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