Twin Peaks Usenet Archive


Subject: criticisms
From: CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu
Date: 1990-12-10, 11:00
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks

=========================================================================
Organization: Penn State University
Date: Monday, 10 Dec 1990 13:18:43 EST
From: 
Message-ID: <90344.131843CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu>
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Subject: response to criticisms

    I am a new member of netnews, since recently looking into it.  I am a big f
an of Twin Peaks and David Lynch.  I read through the articles on TP, and I tho
ught I would offer some of my own thoughts on the subject.  By the way I am cur
rently writing my honors thesis on television and I am discussing TP within the
 paper.  I would appreciate any followup messages about my impressions of the s
how.
     It seems that a lot of the criticism I have been reading regards the plot
structure of the show as well as the notion of Lynch's "style" vs. substance.
I firmly believe that Lynch has created a show of strong substance while mainta
ining the style inherent in his motion pictures.  TP is full of strong human
emotions and passions. There are many episodes in which emotion and reason have
battled on opposite sides in a character's mind. This show more than any I have
seen in recent memory has presented characters fighting within themselves in
an attempt to deal with the grief surrounding the town.  I have been upset for
some time now that people think of TP as nothing but "Who killed Laura Palmer?"
Much more important are such topics as Leland Palmer's grief, Cooper's dealing
with good and evil, Audrey's maturation from a high school tease to a woman
dealing with her feelings for Cooper, and the relationship between Bobby and
Major Briggs(high school rebel and conservative father).  These are just a few
of the many. The point is that these characters as eccentric as they may appear
are really just people dealing with life.  I admit that the show also has some
abnormal topics such as Cooper's sometimes strange approach to crime solving
and the mystical side of the murder's solution.  However, these oddities are
also a breath of fresh air in tv which too often fails to take a chance with
any ideas that are not based in staunch reality.
     I see this show as a brilliant portrayal of humankind, which follows in
the mold Lynch used for Blue Velvet and Wild At Heart.  I have read that people
see parts of the show (specifically Donna and James) as being sappy, but let
us remember that these characters are supposed to be of high school age.  I
don't recall too many very mature high school relationships.  I think that
these students are handling an emotional time of their lives (further complicat
ed by the murder of their friend Laura) as best as they know how.  To get rid
of this aspect of the show would take away from it.
    As I said before I would appreciate any responses.  Thank you.

--Corey Mitchell

=========================================================================
Organization: Penn State University
Date: Monday, 10 Dec 1990 13:56:44 EST
From: 
Message-ID: <90344.135644CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu>
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Distribution: world
Subject: NOTEBOOK A0
      NETPOST  NOTEBOOK A0 V         79         45          1 12/10/90 13:51:43
* K100 NETPOST  NOTEBOOK A0
=========================================================================
Organization: Penn State University
Date: Monday, 10 Dec 1990 13:18:43 EST
From: 
Message-ID: <90344.131843CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu>
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Subject: response to criticisms

    I am a new member of netnews, since recently looking into it.  I am a big f
an of Twin Peaks and David Lynch.  I read through the articles on TP, and I tho
ught I would offer some of my own thoughts on the subject.  By the way I am cur
rently writing my honors thesis on television and I am discussing TP within the
 paper.  I would appreciate any followup messages about my impressions of the s
how.
     It seems that a lot of the criticism I have been reading regards the plot
structure of the show as well as the notion of Lynch's "style" vs. substance.
I firmly believe that Lynch has created a show of strong substance while mainta
ining the style inherent in his motion pictures.  TP is full of strong human
emotions and passions. There are many episodes in which emotion and reason have
battled on opposite sides in a character's mind. This show more than any I have
seen in recent memory has presented characters fighting within themselves in
an attempt to deal with the grief surrounding the town.  I have been upset for
some time now that people think of TP as nothing but "Who killed Laura Palmer?"
Much more important are such topics as Leland Palmer's grief, Cooper's dealing
with good and evil, Audrey's maturation from a high school tease to a woman
dealing with her feelings for Cooper, and the relationship between Bobby and
Major Briggs(high school rebel and conservative father).  These are just a few
of the many. The point is that these characters as eccentric as they may appear
are really just people dealing with life.  I admit that the show also has some
abnormal topics such as Cooper's sometimes strange approach to crime solving
and the mystical side of the murder's solution.  However, these oddities are
also a breath of fresh air in tv which too often fails to take a chance with
any ideas that are not based in staunch reality.
     I see this show as a brilliant portrayal of humankind, which follows in
the mold Lynch used for Blue Velvet and Wild At Heart.  I have read that people
see parts of the show (specifically Donna and James) as being sappy, but let
us remember that these characters are supposed to be of high school age.  I
don't recall too many very mature high school relationships.  I think that
these students are handling an emotional time of their lives (further complicat
ed by the murder of their friend Laura) as best as they know how.  To get rid
of this aspect of the show would take away from it.
    As I said before I would appreciate any responses.  Thank you.

--Corey Mitchell

=========================================================================
Organization: Penn State University
Date: Monday, 10 Dec 1990 13:56:44 EST
From: 
Message-ID: <90344.135644CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu>
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Distribution: world
Subject: NOTEBOOK A0

* K100 NETPOST  NOTEBOOK A0
=========================================================================
Organization: Penn State University
Date: Monday, 10 Dec 1990 13:18:43 EST
From: 
Message-ID: <90344.131843CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu>
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Subject: response to criticisms

    I am a new member of netnews, since recently looking into it.  I am a big f
an of Twin Peaks and David Lynch.  I read through the articles on TP, and I tho
ught I would offer some of my own thoughts on the subject.  By the way I am cur
rently writing my honors thesis on television and I am discussing TP within the
 paper.  I would appreciate any followup messages about my impressions of the s
how.
     It seems that a lot of the criticism I have been reading regards the plot
structure of the show as well as the notion of Lynch's "style" vs. substance.
I firmly believe that Lynch has created a show of strong substance while mainta
ining the style inherent in his motion pictures.  TP is full of strong human
emotions and passions. There are many episodes in which emotion and reason have
battled on opposite sides in a character's mind. This show more than any I have
seen in recent memory has presented characters fighting within themselves in
an attempt to deal with the grief surrounding the town.  I have been upset for
some time now that people think of TP as nothing but "Who killed Laura Palmer?"
Much more important are such topics as Leland Palmer's grief, Cooper's dealing
with good and evil, Audrey's maturation from a high school tease to a woman
dealing with her feelings for Cooper, and the relationship between Bobby and
Major Briggs(high school rebel and conservative father).  These are just a few
of the many. The point is that these characters as eccentric as they may appear
are really just people dealing with life.  I admit that the show also has some
abnormal topics such as Cooper's sometimes strange approach to crime solving
and the mystical side of the murder's solution.  However, these oddities are
also a breath of fresh air in tv which too often fails to take a chance with
any ideas that are not based in staunch reality.
     I see this show as a brilliant portrayal of humankind, which follows in
the mold Lynch used for Blue Velvet and Wild At Heart.  I have read that people
see parts of the show (specifically Donna and James) as being sappy, but let
us remember that these characters are supposed to be of high school age.  I
don't recall too many very mature high school relationships.  I think that
these students are handling an emotional time of their lives (further complicat
ed by the murder of their friend Laura) as best as they know how.  To get rid
of this aspect of the show would take away from it.
    As I said before I would appreciate any responses.  Thank you.

--Corey Mitchell

=========================================================================
Organization: Penn State University
Date: Monday, 10 Dec 1990 13:56:44 EST
From: 
Message-ID: <90344.135644CDM101@psuvm.psu.edu>
Newsgroups: alt.tv.twin-peaks
Distribution: world
Subject: NOTEBOOK A0
      NETPOST  NOTEBOOK A0 V         79         45          1 12/10/90 13:51:43
* K100 NETPOST  NOTEBOOK A0


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